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Why I adore the gluten-free trend.

I love the gluten-free trend.

I said it. And I mean it.

However, it seems most people with celiac disease don’t agree. I’ve read post, after post, after post (you get the point) about why the gluten-free fad is bad.

Though I highly respect all of these bloggers and their opinions, I could not disagree more.

Thanks to fad dieters, I can find and eat a gluten-free version of pretty much ANYTHING in the comfort of my own home. With so many gluten-free options in local grocery stores, I don’t feel like I’m missing out on much. You name it – I can find a gluten-free version only minutes from my tummy. I’m talking gluten-free cookies, bread, pizza, mac and cheese, cereal and the list goes on.

Before the gluten-free fad started, those types of options weren’t so readily available.

If the gluten-free trend wasn’t so … uh … trendy, most companies wouldn’t have a big enough segment of customers to make selling gluten-free products worthwhile.

I don’t know about you, but I like being able to buy pre-made gluten-free foods and not having to make everything from scratch.

As far as eating out, there are restaurants that “offer gluten-free options” and do a horrible job with proper preparations, but there are also restaurants doing it right. A few of my favorites include Red Robin, P.F. Changs, Maggianos and Chipotle.

Educate yourself and decide which restaurants meet your gluten-free needs.

So what if you have to explain to the waiter or waitress that you have celiac disease and special precautions need to be taken when preparing food? I love having that chance to advocate for my disease.

Give me an eye-roll when I order something gluten-free, and I’ll give you a speech.

Who am I to tell people without celiac disease how gluten makes them feel? Heck, maybe gluten makes them feel like crap too. Maybe it doesn’t. I honestly don’t care either way.

If you’re gluten-free, I appreciate you (fad dieters and all). You helped get the world’s attention. Now I have the opportunity to advocate for my disease to an audience who is listening.

Let’s be friends.

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